Cristiano Ronaldo: How Al Nassr Star’s Chelsea, Bayern Munich Ultimatum Saw Him Part With Agent Jorge Mendes

Cristiano Ronaldo: How Al Nassr Star’s Chelsea, Bayern Munich Ultimatum Saw Him Part With Agent Jorge Mendes

  • Cristiano Ronaldo is said to have issued a strict ultimatum to his agent Jorge Mendes
  • Ronaldo wanted to join either Chelsea or Bayern Munich but both clubs failed to sign him
  • The striker went to Saudi Arabia this year but broke things off with his agent

New details have now shed light on what transpired between Jorge Mendes and Cristiano Ronaldo. The two close friends and work colleagues went their separate ways last year after failing to agree on a couple of issues.

Reports had indicated that Ronaldo wanted a way out of Manchester United as early as last summer but couldn't secure a move. He ended up joining Al-Nassr in January.

Cristiano Ronaldo, Al-Nassr, Jorge Mendes, Bayern Munich, Chelsea, Manchester United
Cristiano Ronaldo during his unveiling as a new Al-Nassr player at Mrsool Park Stadium on January 3rd 2023. Photo by Khalid Alhaj/MB Media.
Source: Getty Images

Spanish Publication El Mundo reports that the Portuguese striker is said to have ordered Mendes to get him either Chelsea or Bayern Munich or his 'services would no longer be required.' Ronaldo was keen on moving to a Champions League playing club after United failed to qualify.

Read also

Antonio Conte aims sly dig at Harry Kane despite record-equalling goal

He ended up staying in Manchester and played in the Europa League under Erik ten Hag. Divisions soon rocked the two with the final straw coming after he conducted an interview with Piers Morgan.

Exciting feature: Check out news exactly for YOU ➡️ click on "Recommended for you" and enjoy!

Mendes' issues with Ronaldo

The interview is also said to have been the final wedge between Ronaldo and Mendes. His move to Al-Nassr was facilitated by his close friend Ricky Regufe.

Mendes has been by Ronaldo's side for most of his career and has brokered many of his deals. His first fallout though was when he disagreed with Ronaldo's decision to leave Real Madrid in 2018.

Chelsea's new owners were keen to bring the striker to Stamford Bridge but Thomas Tuchel and subsequently Graham Potter had reservations about the impact he would have in West London.

Read also

Al-Nassr Head Coach vows not to change his game plan to suit Ronaldo

Why Chelsea didn't want Ronaldo

It's very unheard of for a coach to reject a five-time Ballon d'Or winner. A player who has proven himself beyond reasonable doubt that he can win games for his club. And especially at a time when Chelsea have struggled to score goals consistently, the decision did not make sense.

Only that, it did. Tuchel and Potter were right.

Chelsea might have desperately needed a striker after the failed experiment of Romelu Lukaku but Ronaldo's profile wasn't what they wanted. Both coaches have shown they do not work well with target men.

Their centre forwards have to drop deep and get involved in the play. That's why Kai Havertz, despite not scoring consistently, is chosen ahead of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang. Heck, they have even added Joao Felix, a similar player to Havertz's profile.

Ronaldo might have gotten the most lucrative deal in football history but he did so without his long-time partner Mendes. He has since made his debut for his new club in Saudi Arabia.

Read also

Chelsea told to rival Arsenal again for England midfielder

Why Ronaldo could be suspended

And as he continues to settle in the Middle East, Ronaldo's problems are far from over. Sports Brief reported that the 37-year-old is among the players being investigated for falsely wavering their salaries at Juventus in the 2019/2020 season.

Juventus have already been docked 15 points due to fraudulent financial dealings and the scandal could stretch to their players during the said season.

If found guilty, Ronaldo and the other players including then manager Maurizio Sarri could be suspended for 30 days irrespective of the league they are in.

Source: SportsBrief.com